Biology

Biology (science.org):
Tinkering with fungus genes can turn blue cheeses red, green, or white | Scientists discover how Gorgonzola and Roquefort get their color—and how to change it

Biology (nature.com):
All-atom RNA structure determination from cryo-EM maps | Nature Biotechnology

Biology (imb.uq.edu.au):
Researchers have discovered a fault in the bacteria-killing zinc pathway in immune cells in people with cystic fibrosis, and a potential way to get around it to reduce infections.

Biology (cell.com):
Study suggests about one-third of trans men taking testosterone could still be producing eggs every month. Critically, whether a trans man ovulated did not correlate with how long they had been taking HRT, testosterone level, or type of HRT.

Biology (imb.uq.edu.au):
Researchers have discovered why some E. coli bacteria cause severe disease and others don't. A mutation helps affected bacteria spread in the body, a finding that could help fight antibiotic resistance.

Biology (doi.org):
Disruption of mitochondrial unfolded protein response results in telomere shortening in mouse oocytes and somatic cells | Aging

Biology (news.berkeley.edu):
Retrotransposons found in the genomes of the white-throated sparrow and the zebra finch are shown to safely shepherd transgenes into the human genome, providing a gene therapy approach complementary to CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing.

Biology (pnas.org):
For the red-cockaded woodpecker, the oft-cited inclusive fitness theory explains most—but not all—of the bird’s cooperative behavior

Biology (newatlas.com):
Researchers have created lab-grown testicle organoids that closely resemble the real thing. It provides a promising model for research that may advance our understanding of the organs' development and translate into therapeutic applications for male infertility.

Biology (technologynetworks.com):
A study of ancient genomes offers new insights into the prevalence of Down Syndrome in historical societies. Some of the infant's remains that were analyzed had been buried with special objects, indicating they were loved and cherished, the authors said.